Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Varekamp, I., Verbeek, J. H.A.M., & van Dijk, F. J. H. (2006). How can we help employees with chronic diseases to stay at work? A review of interventions aimed at job retention and based on an empowerment perspective. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 80 (2), 87-97.
Title:  How can we help employees with chronic diseases to stay at work? A review of interventions aimed at job retention and based on an empowerment perspective
Authors:  Varekamp, I., Verbeek, J. H.A.M., & van Dijk, F. J. H.
Year:  2006
Journal/Publication:  International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Publisher:  Springer
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-006-0112-9
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://link.springer.com/art...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Systematic review / meta-analysis

Structured abstract:

Background:  A growing number of individuals aged between 16-65 are hampered by a chronic disorder or disability in performing job activities (Beckers et al.2004). Theses individuals are less often employed than others and often leave the workforce prematurely.
Purpose:  The objective of the study is to describe the characteristics, feasibility and effectiveness of job retention interventions provided by vocational rehabilitation agencies.
Setting:  This study is a systematic review. The included studies were undertaken in various locations and settings.
Study sample:  Nine studies were reviewed that were experimental, included an intervention that aimed at job retention by means of solving work-related problems, used an empowerment perspective and concerned employees with chronic illness.
Control or comparison condition:  There were no comparison or control conditions.
Data collection and analysis:  Data on the feasibility of the intervention programs were collected. The following characteristics of the studies were assessed: pretest and/or post test measurement, use of control group, number of participants, follow-up period, outcome measures and effectiveness.
Findings:  There is some evidence that vocational rehabilitation interventions that pay attention to training in requesting work accommodations and feelings of self-confidence or self-efficacy in dealing with work related problems are effective.
Conclusions:  Many studies claim effectiveness, evidence for this was often weak due to short follow up and the lack of control groups. More rigorous evaluation is needed.

Disabilities served:  Medical impairment
Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male
Interventions:  Accommodations
Career counseling
Co-worker supports
Rehabilitation counseling
Training
Vocational assessment
Outcomes:  Increase in tenure
Other