Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Grunert, B. K., Smucker, M. R., Weis, J. M., & Rusch, M. D. (2003). When prolonged exposure fails: Adding an imagery-based cognitive restructuring component in the treatment of industrial accident victims suffering from PTSD. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 10 (4), 333-346.
Title:  When prolonged exposure fails: Adding an imagery-based cognitive restructuring component in the treatment of industrial accident victims suffering from PTSD
Authors:  Grunert, B. K., Smucker, M. R., Weis, J. M., & Rusch, M. D.
Year:  2003
Journal/Publication:  Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
Publisher:  Association for Advancement of Behavior
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/S1077-7229(03)80051-2
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Case history review

Structured abstract:

Background:  Accidents within the work place affect a large number of individuals each year. The most frequently studied traumas have involved victims of combat,physical and sexual assault, natural disaster, and motor vehicle accidents. (p.333)
Purpose:  The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of adding an imagery-based, cognitive restructuring component to the treatment of two victims of work-related injuries suffering from PTSD who and failed to improve from prolonged exposure alone.
Setting:  The study took place in individual treatment sessions provided by the senior author.
Study sample:  This article reviews 2 case studies of individuals receiving Imagery Re-scripting and Reprocessing Therapy (IRRT) in addition to Prolonged Exposure (PE).
Intervention:  The intervention was Imagery Re-scripting and Reprocessing Therapy (IRRT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE).
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  The BDI, IES, State-Trait Anxiety Scale, and the WMS-R Digit Span Sub-test were administered at pre and post-treatment, and again at 1-month, 3-month, and 6 month follow-ups. SUDS ratings were recorded throughout each treatment session as well as at intake, post treatment, and each of the follow-ups.
Findings:  Imagery Rescripting and Reprocessing Therapy appeared to facilitate and foster a significant cognitive shift, which resulted in successful emotional processing and an immediate alleviation of PTSD symptoms. (p.343)
Conclusions:  Prolonged exposure is more likely to be an effective PTSD treatment when fear is the primary emotion and avoidance is the primary coping strategy. An imagery based cognitive-restructuring treatment (IRRT) is likely to be an effective PTSD treatment when non-fear emotions are primary.

Disabilities served:  Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Populations served:  Gender: Male
Interventions:  Other
Outcomes:  Return to work