Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Kitchiner, N. J. (2004). Psychological treatment of three urban fire fighters with post-traumatic stress disorder using eye movement desensitisation reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. Complementary Therapies in Nursing and Midwifery, 10 (3), 186-193.
Title:  Psychological treatment of three urban fire fighters with post-traumatic stress disorder using eye movement desensitisation reprocessing (EMDR) therapy
Authors:  Kitchiner, N. J.
Year:  2004
Journal/Publication:  Complementary Therapies in Nursing and Midwifery
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctnm.2004.01.004
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Case history review

Structured abstract:

Background:  Due to the nature of their work, which can be extremely traumatic, fire fighters are at increased risk of developing mental health problems. Providing adequate mental health services can often take time, leaving the individual without supports and remaining disabled and off work.
Purpose:  The purpose of this paper is to describe the partnership between the South Wales fire service and a NHS department of liaison psychiatry and the rapid psychological treatment provided to traumatized personnel.
Setting:  The setting was a mental health center, in South Wales, United Kingdom.
Study sample:  This article describes three cases which all suffered with PTSD and were treated with Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy.
Intervention:  The intervention was Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Findings:  All three individuals benefited from a short time in treatment and were able to return to work or work with less trauma.
Conclusions:  Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy appears to be a potentially useful psychological treatment for PTSD.

Disabilities served:  Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Populations served:  Gender: Male
Interventions:  Other
Outcomes:  Return to work